Saturday, June 23, 2007

Mirror therapy interest is gaining momentum.

The International Journal of Rehabilitation Research. 30(2):181-188, June 2007. reported a pilot study
Mirror box therapy added to cognitive behavioural therapy in three chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I patients:
Vladimir Tichelaar, Y.I.G. a; Geertzen, Jan H.B. b c; Keizer, Doeke d; Paul van Wilgen, C. b

The study found that
pain at rest, pain after measuring allodynia/hyperalgesia and pain after measuring strength decreased. Range of motion improved in two patients and strength improved in one patient.

Another trial reported in
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Volume 88, Issue 5, Pages 555-559 by S. S├╝tbeyaz, G. Yavuzer, N. Sezer, B. Koseoglu is looking at how
Mirror Therapy Enhances Lower-Extremity Motor recovery and Motor Functioning After Stroke: A

I'm hoping to see the Netherlands study which finished in February published soon. I'm aware that there is interest in Germany and in Canada.

As mentioned in previous posts
http://www.howtocopewithpain.org/ is leading awareness in the USA. In the UK mirror box therapy is widely accepted with mirror boxes in pain clinics across the country. http://www.mirrorboxtherapy.com/ has great information and leads awareness there. They provide mirror boxes. Dr Lorimer Moseley travels the world explaining the new science of pain. "Explain Pain" which he co-wrote with David Butler is a valuable tool for understanding this new approach to pain. http://www.noigroup.com/is Australia's leader in promoting this new approach to pain as well as providing resources such as mirror boxes, "Explain Pain" and the limb recognition program "Recognize".

Now research has proven with MRI results that the brain changes with chronic pain. More recently we've learnt that changing the inputs or messages to the brain, which is known to have plasticity, causes the brain to change. These are not emotional responses to fragile egos. This is real science showing the pain and symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome can be managed and possibly resolved using simple, inexpensive, practical methods. This is treating the source and not just bandaiding the symptoms. This is very good news for sufferers.

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